Sunday, February 28, 2010

Dog Walk

Dog Walk, 24 x 20
SOLD

Above is the second in a series I'm painting from my trip to Colorado last September. I'm going to post this completed painting by itself for the moment, but will add a couple shots I took earlier in the process. It will help demonstrate a cool blocking-in idea Laurel came up with for our alla prima class. For lack of an established name, I refer to it as the "rub in, rub out" technique. Stay tuned. . . .

 

Okay, here is a snapshot of the completed block-in. It's all done using a dark neutral, a large brush, paper towels and linseed oil. The linseed oil is used to allow the paint to spread more easily, the large brush to get the canvas covered more quickly and to keep you from getting too detailed. The paper towel is used to rub off excess paint from areas on the canvas that have lighter values than what has been applied with the dark neutral.

So, to begin with, start placing the main, simplified shapes on the canvas in their correct location on the canvas. One cool thing about this process is it's very low pressure. If you don't like where you applied your dark neutral, or you applied too much, just rub out the necessary areas with paper towel, and rub in with your brush the areas that need to be darker. Any dark neutral that remains on the canvas will just add punch to the shadow areas. 

To make it easier for the dark neutral to spread easily, dip a paper towel in linseed oil and scrub a thin amount of the dark neutral into the canvas. Do be careful not to make the underpainting runny or to use so much oil that the canvas gets shiny reflections. If this happens, use paper towels to pick up the excess.

Continue applying and removing the dark neutral until you have a good value map that is accurate in the placement and also in creating an accurate range of values on the canvas before adding color.



Now you're ready to start putting in color. Paint in the main color masses, blended in on top of the dark neutral underpainting, and continue until, finally, you've added in the all the highlights and everything looks the way you dreamed it would.

11 comments:

Kaylyn said...

oh! this is just marvelous! the light and atmosphere are perfect! (I'm a native Coloradan and I know what I'm talkin' about here!!)

Sheila said...

Oooo, a teaser for what's to come....
I love this Stephen! This is quite a good size and I had a good time traipsing down this path behind these two dogs admiring the trees and the blue skies. I went back and looked at the enlarged version several times.

LindaHunt said...

This is wonderful Stephen! It is an interesting process. I am a native of Wyoming... right next door! Really enjoy the way you captured the light and feeling of a warm Colorado day.

dacoop said...

This is a stunner Stephen! Thanks for sharing your process too...it works!!

Laurel Daniel said...

Gorgeous painting and fabulous description of the process. Great, great, great!

Mitzi Easley said...

Oh My, really great work Stephen. the composition is stellar - the path really draws me in -- and the variation in greens is fabulous. A series, you say? Can't wait to see it... this is just super!

Amanda Carder said...

Wow my first time to your Blog and I just love your work!

Angela Elledge said...

Ok, can this painting be my favorite, thus far? I enjoyed seeing the steps illustrated and the painting is a gem, I especially like the strong contrast of values. This seems very sentimental and nostalgic to me...sentimental in a good way, not sappy. Looking forward to more!

Ann Rogers said...

This is a "dream come true" painting..beautiful in every respect..design, color and value!

Trevor Lingard said...

A great piece Stephen
Thank you for showing the build up of your painting.
Regards

Johanne Morin said...

It was nice meeting you today Stephen in class with Laurel Daniel. I like your blog and artwork.